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Newest Exhibit Innovation from Nomadic Wins Two Awards at Exhibitor2014

by Gwen Parsons 16. April 2014 21:01

Exhibitor2014 is the trade show for trade show and corporate event marketing professionals. The 25th annual conference offered 160 education sessions, an expanded exhibition hall and an inaugural Awards Night.

We premiered our newest trade show exhibit innovation, the DesignLine® Wall System, with a trade show booth design that received rave reviews from attendees. Visitors reacted with delight to our brightly colored graphics and variety of lighting options including backlit walls, LED color changing downlights and whimsical accent lighting.


The exhibit was so well received we generated an increase of 65% more visitors.

Floor to ceiling fabric graphics featured face-to-face conversations about what marketers need from their exhibit partner. Exhibit marketers adapt their programs to meet the changes their business undergoes, often with limited resources. Our presentation was designed to illustrate how Nomadic helps exhibitors turn change into new opportunities with modular displays that adapt to fit a new use or situation.


This short animation illustrates how Nomadic trade show displays
adapt, expand and evolve to meet your changing business needs.

Many thanks to everyone who visited our trade show exhibit. If you were unable to be there, you may enjoy viewing this short video.

 

Exhibitor hosted a gala Awards Night to present 2014 awards for exhibition excellence to winners at a dinner and ceremony. The Walton County Tourist Development Council exhibit received not one but TWO awards! Designed by Zehnder and Synergy Design Group, we produced the custom modular exhibit with our new DesignLine Wall System. A juried panel selected it to receive the Best 10x10 exhibit award. By popular vote, it also received the People’s Choice award. Our sincerest thanks to everyone to voted!

patandluz

Luz Lobos, President, Synergy Design Group
Pat Goeke, President, Nomadic Display

is the Senior Vice President of Marketing at Nomadic Display. She is a regular contributor to the Nomadic Display Blog and can be found at Google + and LinkedIn.

 

What Your Exhibit Designer Needs From You

by Gwen Parsons 10. July 2013 00:12

Exhibitors often ask what information is needed to start a new trade show booth design. Ideally you want a well thought out trade show display solution that will help you achieve your marketing objectives. Better quality input from you will produce better quality output from your exhibit designer.  So take the time to gather the right input.

1. Exhibiting calendar

Once you have selected your trade shows, create a list of each of the events you plan to attend and their space sizes. Based on the number of events and their space sizes, it may be worth considering a modular display that can scale to fit different change and adapt to each event and trim provide you with costs savings that may be applied across your trade show marketing program. If you have  a one off situation, it may be advisable to use a trade show display rental.

2. Concise design brief

Your brief should describe your marketing goals, how you plan to engage your visitors, explain your products/services that will be featured and demonstrated. Try to express the look and feel you want your brand to portray to potential clients.  Describe your plans for visitor interaction – touch screen programs, product sampling, small group meetings, live presentations, etc.  While you may not have every detail pinned down, document what is firm in your mind.

A brief is not only helpful to your designer, it can also help you evaluate the display design concepts they present. Download our Exhibit Design Strategies which contains a tutorial to help you write a brief.

3. Realistic budget

Be open about discussing your budget and any cost cutting strategies you want to pursue.  Designers do their best to create a design solution to fit your budget.  Prepare for the discussion by researching the size and type of display designs that fit the design brief you created.

4. Design tools

Design time is better spent designing than searching for materials.  Your designer will need to understand the corporate image guidelines for your brand, and have access to the logos, artwork, photos and/or graphic images you want used in your exhibit design.  You will need high quality images since they will be printed in large format. If you decide to have graphics designed by an agency, you will need to provide them with graphic file preparation instructions like the ones in our GraphicSource Guide.

5. Adequate time

Plan to provide a brief to your exhibit designer at least three to six months prior to your event.  You will receive a better thought out exhibit design with less stress for all involved.  Keep in mind the time required for decision-making by members of your organization.  Artwork proofing and exhibit build production times will vary depending on the size of your project.

 

Plan Now To Avoid Panic Later

by Gwen Parsons 28. June 2013 19:20

Fall trade shows and events are just a couple of months away so summer is a great time to get organized. Remember Bill Murray’s movie “What About Bob?” Richard Dreyfuss played his psychiatrist and the author of “Baby Steps.” The trick is to break big problems, like event planning, down into small steps so they can be accomplished in an orderly manner. The first baby step toward a Fall event is to create a checklist of activities and their due dates. Here are some tips on how to get started.
Promotion Campaign
Develop a marketing plan for the event. Consider all of the on- and offline opportunities to promote your presence at the upcoming event. Your plan may include advertising, sponsorships, free VIP passes, press releases, a banner on your website, email broadcasts, newsletters, social media posts, premium giveaways etc. Using target dates for release, you can estimate when to place orders and start the development of artwork. Ideally your messages will be carried through in graphics, presentations, and other materials at the event.
Inspect your display
Be sure your display is prepared to represent you. Shabby graphics will reflect poorly on your company so order replacements when needed. If you plan to purchase a new trade show display, it’s a good idea to draft a brief. Describe your marketing objectives, the products and services you want to push, and interactions you are planning for visitors. Get input, buy in or approval on the brief from appropriate managers. Gaining consensus at the beginning will help you avoid having to tackle internal obstacles at the finish line. The brief can help speed your request for design proposals and guide your evaluation of display solutions.

Show Services
By now you have, or will soon receive, your exhibitor service manual. As the official digest of everything you need to know about the event, it’s important to go through it carefully. Determine which show services you will need and add the early bird dates for form submissions to your checklist. By planning to submit your service orders by the early bird due date you accomplish two things. First, you get the best rates on the services you need, savings of as much as 50 percent. Second, if you miss an early bird submission date you still have time to meet the final advance due date and qualify for some savings.

Book your travel
According to Sean O’Neal of BBC Travel, the old rule of thumb – booking tickets three months ahead for the lowest prices – seems now to be out of synch with the latest research. Based on studies by Kayak and FareCompare, O’Neal suggests purchasing on Tuesday afternoon, about three weeks in advance for domestic US tickets and a little more than a month in advance for international tickets to get the best deal.

As for hotels, compare the rate secured by show management to online rates. I got lucky searching online one night and saved over $1,500 for my team to stay at an event’s host hotel.

Beware: dates on this calendar are closer than they appear. If you find you’re already near a due date, don’t be discouraged. You’ve completed your first baby step!

 

Nomadic Meeting Business Owner Needs at Small Business Expo

by Gwen Parsons 21. May 2013 19:08

Last week Nomadic Display participated in the Small Business Expo at Pier 12. The show is designed as one day event to best accommodate small business owners that don’t have time to be away from the office.  Packed with value each free registration for attendees included a keynote presentation, workshops, speed networking, a show floor featuring hundreds of exhibitors, Shark Tank casting, and even an after party!  With an impressive turn out and over 6,700 people who liked the event on Facebook, it was a great show.

Virtually every small business need was represented from A (accounting) to Z…er W (web design). Nomadic was there to inspire small businesses to make trade shows a must in their marketing mix.  We even brought our new Inspire fabric trade show display with us.  It generated trade show booth envy among our neighbors and potential buyers.  If you weren’t able to be there, then you can view the next best thing below.



Some of our fellow exhibitors are already clients, trade show display like IROC. In fact, many of the people we met already participate in trade shows and were excited to learn how we could help them Stand Apart and be Show Smart.  By the end of the day we exceeded our show goals -- from new leads to an on-site interview and an invitation to serve as a judge at an upcoming event.

Next time you visit the Big Apple and want to celebrate your success, book a table at the Lambs Club on West 44th St. between 6th Ave and Broadway.  Enjoy a mouth-watering steak or sea bass and a “to die for” dessert like chocolate soufflé with sour cherries or cheesecake with asparagus ice cream.  Ask for Patrick, he’s a delightful gastronomic guide.

the lamb's club

 

Ten Tips for Producing Your Own Videos

by Gwen Parsons 21. February 2013 18:02

Video is powerful and has many uses, whether you're a B2B marketer, or work directly with consumers in the B2C world. B2C marketers often use video to convert buyers on e-commerce sites, and B2B marketers see success when using them to raise awareness and interest in their products and services.

Get creative! Put videos in your emails, on corporate sites, and social media networks. Customers can also play them on-demand, on tablets and smart phones – and don’t forget to include an eye-catching video in your trade show display

Nomadic Videos

(View Nomadic Display videos here)

Here are our top 10 tips for adding video to your marketing arsenal:

1. Establish your goals.
Sure, video is great, but you should have a strategy. Be clear about what you want your video to do for you. Introduce your company? Promote a new product? Build confidence in your service? Consider how you will measure the success of your video - views, re-posts, website traffic, etc. If you don’t know what you should expect with your first video, monitor these and other metrics to create a baseline for comparison to future videos.

2. Tell your story.
The passion you have for your company, product or service can be contagious – video is great at capturing this passion unlike any other medium! Strive to educate and entertain your viewers. Create content that addresses your client’s key pain points and the factors that influence their purchase decisions. Think about the content you want to present and then decide the best method to communicate it - an interview with a member of your organization’s leadership? A how-to demonstration? Live testimonials taped in your booth?

3. Plan your shoot.
Storyboard the shots you’ll need to videotape. Thinking it through will help you generate a list of what you’ll need - from what people you'll use, to what props will work best and the location(s) you'll need. Just remember to choose a location with good lighting.

4. Need Voice?
If you plan to videotape someone speaking, provide them witha microphone. An alternative is to write a script and record a voiceover track to be added in the post production editing stage. Your script can be translated and recorded to create different language versions of your video. Be sure to record in a closed, quiet room free from noise in surrounding areas.

5. Action!
You don't need a big budget - an amateur can run the camera, but invest in a tripod to eliminate the potential for shaky results. To avoid distractions in the background, shoot close to your subjects. For how-to demos, avoid shots with anyone’s back to the camera. Instead have them stand to the side or facing the camera whenever possible.

6. Keep it brief.
In the fast-moving Internet age, most agree that a few minutes is all you need for the final edited video. A general rule of thumb is 3-4 minutes.

7. Sound of music.
Background music should enhance the presentation, but not over power it. Consider adding music to the intro and possibly again at the end. Be sure to use rights-free or royalty-free music.

8. Contact us.
Remember to title your video and include your company logo at the beginning. Close your video with contact information and/or your website URL so that viewers from viral sharing can find you.

9. Optimize your video with titles, descriptions, and tags.

10. Have fun.
According to Dale Carnegie “People rarely succeed unless they have fun in what they are doing.” 


How to Stand Out at Trade Shows With Motion Graphics

by Gwen Parsons 14. February 2013 12:17

Trade show attendees are bombarded by stimuli at shows. A crowded show fights for attention from all of an attendee’s senses – sight, sound, smell, taste and touch.  So what can you do as an exhibitor to make your display stand out in a sea of others?

Technology is offering us new ways to engage visitors.  Flat screen monitors continue to grow bigger in size and smaller in price, so consider adding one to your display to complement your booth. Wide screen monitors offer a great way to stand out from the crowd, get the attention of passersby and communicate your marketing message in seconds.  Consequently exhibitors are incorporating wide screen monitors with motion graphics more frequently into their trade show displays.

Motion graphics presentations play continuously on a loop throughout the duration of your event. Motion graphics don't have to be a huge undertaking; they can be created using stock photos, commissioned photography, rendered art, and video. They can be strictly visual or include music and sounds.

Plus, you'll get a lot of mileage out of these graphics. A single investment in a motion graphic presentation can be used to promote your company and its products before, during and after your shows. For pre-show promotion put it on your website and include it in your email broadcasts.

At the event, create an inviting atmosphere that makes buyers feel comfortable approaching and entering your space. Monitors with motion graphic presentations can be positioned to play out to the aisles as a way to draw attendees into your space.  You can also place motion graphics within your space. A warm, even soothing, environment can extend and enhance your engagement with visitors. Click here for a relaxing example.

Another way to put your graphics to use is after the event by your sales team during face-to-face meetings. Graphics can be played on demand on their tablet or smart phone.

For more on this topic, take a look at this webinar hosted by the Trade Group.

 

Four Displays in One! Making Your Trade Show Booth More Cost-Effective

by Gwen Parsons 29. January 2013 21:02

In a sea of trade show booths, we know how important it is to make the best first impression you possibly can. Visitors are constantly being
 bombarded with visuals as they walk through a trade show venue, so you
 want to do your best to make sure yours is the display that catches their 
eye.

To help you do just that we're pleased to announce our new line of innovative fabric display solutions, Inspire. One of the most attractive features of the 
Inspire series is its convertibility. The canopy can be altered into four 
different shapes, all using the same cover. This makes it easy to attract attention with different designs without having to buy a number of different types of displays.

Exhibitors can have a unique look from show to show. Inspire’s innovative canopy converts into four different shapes using the same tension fabric canopy cover – its like getting four display designs for the price of one. Inspire is a budget-stretching tension fabric display solution because it's scalable, enabling exhibitors to get an upscale, custom modular look but at an affordable and competitive price. Get the latest features and functions in the form of interchangeable accessories, scalability, on case packing/shipping for a basic unit, and easy set-up.

Additionally, options like iPad stands, monitors, product pedestals, waterfall brackets, slatwall and more mount easily to aluminum extrusions. Mix and match or rearrange them to suit different presentation requirements.

A ten foot Inspire expands into an impressive twenty foot inline and converts into a kiosk or even a table top with the purchase of additional fabric graphic panels. Plus Inspire is delivered ready to accept a second fabric graphic panel on the back side for double the presentation impact.

The new “Inspire” line of fabric displays offer exhibitors an upscale aesthetic at a refreshingly competitive price tag. Get all the details of our new Inspire line here.

 

 

Are Your Graphics Working for You?

by Kat Shea 4. October 2012 02:09

When it comes to creating a trade show display that has maximum impact, good graphic design is essential. You only have a matter of seconds to grab someone's attention as they walk past your display, so your graphics need to communicate who you are and what you do within the shortest time possible.

Many times the role of display graphics is underestimated. Trade show graphics are your primary communication tool so they need to reflect your company or product's sense of style, appeal to your audience and be easy to read. Design for display graphics is very different from brochure, packaging or website graphics. Your designer needs to balance additional factors into exhibit graphic design including viewing distances, lighting, surface shapes and sizes, text, fonts, colors, imagery, and messaging hierarchy.

What makes this even more difficult is that exhibit graphics often come last in the decision-making process about the display, which means there may be tight time constraints, and of course everyone involved with the display design may have differing opinions. What we've found through working with thousands of exhibitors is that it helps to have a framework for working through the design process. While each graphic has its own role in your messaging hierarchy, your graphics should also complement each other, and work together well as a unified whole.

In general, your highest, largest areas are reserved for company identification. These graphics tend to be visually bold and easy to see from a distance. Once visitors are at your display, there are graphics designed to direct them to the various areas within your floor plan – live presentation areas, product demonstration areas, and so forth. Finally, there are up-close graphics meant for individual consumption. These might include product benefit descriptions, service locations, or maybe instructions for self-driven interactions. Your display may utilize some or all of these types of graphics.

Trade Show Display Graphics, Exhibit Graphics and Booth Graphics

It's a good idea to ask your designer to provide a rendering of your display with the graphic images superimposed on it, so that you may preview the overall graphic direction. In addition to getting a feel for how the display looks, a preview also enables you to ensure that the location of graphic areas won't be obstructed by booth furnishings, your products, or visitors engaged with interactive elements.

Use our handy checklist to evaluate whether your graphics are working. 

How do you know that your graphic design is working for you?

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