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Museums Choose Modular Exhibit Systems For Gallery Exhibitions

by Gwen Parsons 26. August 2015 22:58

Trade shows open up our world life experience. Sure we conduct business but trade shows and events also give us the opportunity to enjoy local experiences. On your next trip to New Orleans, make a stop at the National WWII Museum. Receiving a half million visitors each year may help explain why it was voted the #1 tourist attraction in New Orleans by TripAdvisor.



Dedicated to telling the story of the American experience in WWII, the Museum offers a compelling portrayal of why it was fought, how it was won and what it means to us today. Over the past 15 years the Museum has grown into a six acre campus with an expansive collection of artifacts including a submarine and incomparable examples of wartime aircraft.

In addition to permanent installations, the Museum showcases rotating exhibits. A few years ago, an exhibition from the US Holocaust Museum using Nomadic Display portable modular display systems travelled to the WWII Museum as a temporary installation. The Museum was impressed with the exhibit system. So when the time came to purchase modular displays for their “Manufacturing Victory” exhibit last year, they contacted Synergy Design Group of New Orleans. The Museum wanted a display system that would enable them to integrate and repurpose the displays for future use in new exhibitions. John Costa, Exhibit Designer, was delighted by the experience saying “Synergy is a joy to work with.”



So when planning this year’s new travelling exhibition about the African American experience in WWII, they brought Synergy Design Group in to work on the project. Entitled “Fighting for the Right to Fight”, the exhibition features large scale modular displays and rich graphic imagery that have to be easy to break down, ship and reassemble.

Next summer the “Fighting for the Right to Right” exhibition will begin a two year national tour.

“Synergy Design Group is able to meet tight deadlines and field last minute changes so I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend them. We are extremely pleased with Nomadic’s exhibit systems, the quality of manufacturing and the ease with which we will be able to repurpose them” said John Costa, Exhibit Designer.

To see more examples of museum installations using portable modular exhibit systems, visit our client gallery.

is the Senior Vice President of Marketing at Nomadic Display. She is a regular contributor to the Nomadic Display Blog and can be found at Google + and LinkedIn.

 

Five Tips for International Exhibiting

by Gwen Parsons 10. October 2013 17:48

International exhibitions can present new and different challenges. Aside from the logistics there are also cultural differences to consider. To put your best foot forward at trade shows, it’s important to be informed before you travel abroad.

1. Think Global, Act Local
While English may be considered a universal language, you may benefit from having a translator present in your trade show exhibit or exhibition stand.

Although many business men and women converse in English, it’s important to provide trade show attendees with print or digital information in their native language. Potential prospects need to fully comprehend the benefits of your products and services. Many cultures seek technical details, so provide metric measurements and weights. 

Bring plenty of business cards. Unless you have arranged for your toll free telephone number to be accessible from other countries, be sure to include a direct dial telephone number.

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2. Don’t Assume, Ask.

While regions may share similarities, every country can be different. 

The US uses 120v electricity and Japan uses 110v. Many European countries, Russia and China use 220v. Brazil uses 110v and 220v. So you’ll need to have adaptors and transformers for American lights or purchase or rent substitutes.

Drayage, delivering exhibit shipments from the loading dock to your booth space, is a common expense in US trade shows. That expense may be combined with other fees, or require no charge, in other countries.

Avoid surprises by inquiring about what materials and services are subject to VAT (value added tax) or GST (goods and services tax) - at what rate, and whether or how you may file for reimbursement.

3. Get help from experts
Consider working with an experienced exhibit company that has their own international offices. Customs can be a complex and lengthy process. Paperwork errors can cause delays that impact your budget. Exhibit plans often need to be submitted along with documentation to show management to verify it meets local electrical and fire safety regulations.

Nomadic has multiple offices in key trade show cities like Las Vegas, New York, DC, London and Frankfurt. This enables us to coordinate display design, production, rentals, graphics and logistical support from the locations closest to client events so we can save them time, money and headaches.

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4. Basic Business Etiquette

Before you leave, learn as much as you can about the culture of your trade show audience. When in doubt, err on the side of formality.

In general, conservative business attire is recommended. Keep your hands out of your pockets and hand gestures to a minimum as it can be off putting. 

Greet visitors using their last name until you are asked to address someone by their first name. Don’t rush through introductions. Age demands a higher level of respect in Asia, so address older people first. European business people often greet one another with a firm handshake, whereas Asian countries tend to avoid body contact. Asking personal questions of any kind may be viewed as inappropriate.

5. Take Your Time
You want to build new relationships through face-to-face contact. Many cultures attitude toward time is more relaxed and conversation more casual. Take time to get to know visitors before diving into a sales pitch. Refreshments encourage casual conversation so in-booth hospitality is often incorporated into the display design. Offer visitors comfortable seating, a hot or cold drink and light snacks. 

In general, American trade show hours are shorter than in other countries. Adapt your booth schedule accordingly to incorporate frequent breaks for your staff. Jet lag combined with longer hours on your feet is a recipe for fatigue.

American exhibitors often hold brief conversations with many visitors and collect their information to contact them after the show. Exhibitions are used for in-depth discussions or to close business deals in some cultures.  Lastly, don’t let a lengthy evaluation process frustrate you; some cultures don’t make decisions at a rapid pace.

Do you have others tips to share with our readers?


is the Senior Vice President of Marketing at Nomadic Display. She is a regular contributor to the Nomadic Display Blog and can be found at Google + and LinkedIn.

 

Marketing Executives’ Outlook on Trade Shows and Events

by Gwen Parsons 7. August 2013 20:22

The Chief Marketing Officers Council and the Exhibit and Event Marketers Association recently partnered to benchmark the value of trade shows and events based on a survey of senior level corporate marketing executives. The results have been released in a report entitled “Customer Attainment from Event Engagement” and addressed in a symposium held last week. Here are some of my key takeaways:

Trade shows and events are core to the marketing mix

  • Exhibitions and events are viewed as a major source of new prospects and opportunities for gathering leads and meeting with customers.
  • Survey respondents rated conferences, conventions, trade shows, expos, and customer hospitality events as most important to their business development strategies. Online events, large event sponsorships, and dealer meetings were rated least important.
  • Forty percent of survey respondents are replacing big shows with more vertical market events that offer targeted audiences.
  • Forty-four percent are hosting their own customer events.

Marketing budgets remain steady

  • The CMO Council’s “2013 State of Marketing” study reported that an average of nine percent of the marketing budget is allocated to trade shows and another three percent to corporate events for an impressive total of twelve percent.
  • More than half of survey respondents said their budget allocation will remain the same next year.
  • One of the top challenges identified by marketers was managing escalating costs within their trade show budget.

Marketers anticipate increased demand for justification

  • In order to make a strong business case for trade show participation marketers are seeking front end and back office measurements to demonstrate event effectiveness.
  • Attendee mix and quality is the top criteria used by marketers to select events. Marketers expressed their need for reliable attendee information from show organizers - before and after the event.
  • In addition, the study revealed interest among marketers for show organizers to employ new technologies such as RFID badges, QR codes, and Apps to provide metrics such as booth visits, length of stay, and conference content access.

There’s room for improvement in the back office as well. Marketers continue to wrestle with how trade shows and events contribute to sales revenue. Only about one third of marketers feel their company does a good job converting leads into business opportunities. Although more than 40 percent of marketers say they have CRM systems they are happy with, they don’t have visibility into the sales funnel and conversion pipeline.

is the Senior Vice President of Marketing at Nomadic Display. She is a regular contributor to the Nomadic Display Blog and can be found at Google + and LinkedIn.

 

Plan Now To Avoid Panic Later

by Gwen Parsons 28. June 2013 19:20

Fall trade shows and events are just a couple of months away so summer is a great time to get organized. Remember Bill Murray’s movie “What About Bob?” Richard Dreyfuss played his psychiatrist and the author of “Baby Steps.” The trick is to break big problems, like event planning, down into small steps so they can be accomplished in an orderly manner. The first baby step toward a Fall event is to create a checklist of activities and their due dates. Here are some tips on how to get started.
Promotion Campaign
Develop a marketing plan for the event. Consider all of the on- and offline opportunities to promote your presence at the upcoming event. Your plan may include advertising, sponsorships, free VIP passes, press releases, a banner on your website, email broadcasts, newsletters, social media posts, premium giveaways etc. Using target dates for release, you can estimate when to place orders and start the development of artwork. Ideally your messages will be carried through in graphics, presentations, and other materials at the event.
Inspect your display
Be sure your display is prepared to represent you. Shabby graphics will reflect poorly on your company so order replacements when needed. If you plan to purchase a new trade show display, it’s a good idea to draft a brief. Describe your marketing objectives, the products and services you want to push, and interactions you are planning for visitors. Get input, buy in or approval on the brief from appropriate managers. Gaining consensus at the beginning will help you avoid having to tackle internal obstacles at the finish line. The brief can help speed your request for design proposals and guide your evaluation of display solutions.

Show Services
By now you have, or will soon receive, your exhibitor service manual. As the official digest of everything you need to know about the event, it’s important to go through it carefully. Determine which show services you will need and add the early bird dates for form submissions to your checklist. By planning to submit your service orders by the early bird due date you accomplish two things. First, you get the best rates on the services you need, savings of as much as 50 percent. Second, if you miss an early bird submission date you still have time to meet the final advance due date and qualify for some savings.

Book your travel
According to Sean O’Neal of BBC Travel, the old rule of thumb – booking tickets three months ahead for the lowest prices – seems now to be out of synch with the latest research. Based on studies by Kayak and FareCompare, O’Neal suggests purchasing on Tuesday afternoon, about three weeks in advance for domestic US tickets and a little more than a month in advance for international tickets to get the best deal.

As for hotels, compare the rate secured by show management to online rates. I got lucky searching online one night and saved over $1,500 for my team to stay at an event’s host hotel.

Beware: dates on this calendar are closer than they appear. If you find you’re already near a due date, don’t be discouraged. You’ve completed your first baby step!

 

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